COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION. Spanish Revolution of 1936 2019-02-09

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION Rating: 9,4/10 305 reviews

Collectives in the Spanish revolution

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Es lo que denominamos viejos prejuicios, que favorecieron unas interpretaciones tremendamente ideologizadas. Nobody said 'Señor' or 'Don' or even 'Usted'; everyone called everyone else 'Comrade' or 'Thou', and said 'Salud! A series of decrees designedto bring the collectives under ever closer State supervision wereparalleled by attempts to sabotage their functioning which includeddeliberate disruptions of urban-rural exchanges, and the systematicdenial of working capital and raw materials to many collectives Amsden 1979; Breitbart 1979a, 1979b; Geurin 1970. It was the first time that I had ever been in a town where the working class was in the saddle. And it was the aspect of the crowds that was the queerest thing of all. A new safety and signalsystem was built. Blood of Spain: An Oral History of the Spanish Civil War. The ideas in it are simply priceless.

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Collectives in the Spanish revolution

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Rockefeller, if you were to come to Fraga with your entire bank account you would not be able to buy a cup of coffee. These struggles culminated with a coup d'etat against the Restoration regime in 1923, which brought Primo de Rivera to power as dictator. All services such as electricity and gas were freeas well as free and hugely improved medical, educational andentertainment facilities. Many ofthese industries were vast in size: for example, nearly the entireSpanish textile industry, with nearly a quarter of a million workersscattered over several cities, was placed under self-management Flood et al 1997: 201. The libcom library contains nearly 20,000 articles.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Mydiscussion of Anarcho-syndicalism - stateless socialism - has soughtto demonstrate the intellectually coherence, feasibility anddesirability of just such an alternative. This article presents an analysis of the libertarian collectivizations created during the Spanish civil war 1936—1939. You would probably be told that people arejust naturally greedy and self-centred and such a thing would end inchaos. This volume ends with an essay by Gaston Laval written many years ago as well as a concluding essay by Dolgoff. Various regions of Spain — primarily , , , , and parts of.

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Spanish Revolution of 1936

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

The Valencia Flour Mills 3. Clearly, the collectivisation process in revolutionary Spainindicates that the goals of classlesness, workers' self-management,distribution according to need, and democratic economic planning wereboth realisable and quite compatible with economic efficiency,innovation, increased output, and even ecological concerns. The other , particularly the anarchists and , disagreed vehemently with this; to them the war and the revolution were one and the same. Some possible implications of this anarchist experience both for the current organization of industry and society as well as for research on the individualism-collectivism dimension are suggested. Synopsis Gaston Leval's study brings together two aspects that are generally difficult to unite—analysis and testimony. Payne, Spanish Revolution, 240—1; Luis Garrido González, 'Producción agraria y guerra civil', in Casanova, ed.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution (eBook, 2018) [alteredpt.com.au]

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

There was much in this that I did not understand, in some ways I did not even like it, but I recognized it immediately as a state of affairs worth fighting for. It was hampered by the egotism of collectivists who gave top priority to their own needs or those of their village and neglected the requirements of the war and revolution. The revolution also showed that without the competition bred by capitalism, industry can be run in a much more rational manner. Both ofthese structures of social organisation are integrally linked to, andcomplement, each other. Far frombeen harassed to join they were often allowed to avail of the manyfree services of the collectives. Sam Dolgoff's work is very well documented and insightful.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution » CG Resource

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

This article explores the history of rural collectivization in the Republican zone throughout the Spanish Revolution and civil war 1936-9. Many of these have a deeply historical seam running through them; they seek to revise the standard historiography of the left that places anarchism as a poor second to Marxism, to revive the memory of key thinkers in the history of the tradition, or to recover the centrality of anarchists and anarchist thought to the Spanish and Cuban Revolutions, as well as to anticolonial and liberation struggles worldwide see A. The workers' committees often included a number oftechnical experts as well. Bartering and black marketeering in the countryside abandoned many urban residents and much of the Republican army to their hungry fates. Five days after the fascists werebeaten off the streets the trams were running under workers' control.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Track and roadway repaired and improved, anautomatic breakdown warning system installed and many linesre-routed. The Spanish Revolution page has been online for more than a decade and contains dozens of articles on the Spanish Civil War from an anarchist perspective as well as links to many photographs of the civil war. Traditions some viewed as oppressive were done away with. In Mas de Las Mantas a huge collective bakery handled all the bakingpreviously the exclusive task of women in the home. Thus, the collectives' ultimate failure was a lack of unity at thenational level; the financial system, in particular, was notsocialised, whilst the non-Francoist State itself continued toexist. Finally, the paper points at the issue of political violence, that some interpretations try to represent as directly tied to the Anarchism. The ordinary class-division of society had disappeared to an extent that is almost unthinkable in the money-tainted air of England; there was no one there except the peasants and ourselves, and no one owned anyone else as his master.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution » CG Resource

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Many of the normal motives of civilized life—snobbishness, money-grubbing, fear of the boss, etc. This book can only deal with a few of the collectives that were established in Spain during the struggle against Franco, for, as the author points out, there were 400 agricultural collectives in Aragon, 900 in the Levante and 300 in Castile. I was immensely impressed by the constructive revolutionary work which is being done by the C. All the major services were greatly improved. They instituted not bourgeois formal democracy but genuine grass roots functional libertarian democracy, where each individual participated directly in the revolutionary reorganization of social life. A self managed society with everyonehaving a real say in how things were run is a lovely ideal. Overall this meant an increase in livingstandards of 50-100%.

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Collectives in the Spanish Revolution

COLLECTIVES IN THE SPANISH REVOLUTION

Also most factorieshad to retool for the war effort which made huge demands on labourtime. They kindled in everyone the required sense of responsibility, and knew how, by eloquent appeals, to keep alive the spirit of sacrifice for the general welfare of the people. Here are just a few opinions of foreign journalists who have no personal connection with the Anarchist movement. Backward and forward linkages were established between collectives,the transport system was correspondingly revamped, whilst the railwaylines were themselves placed under the control of the C. The book opens with an insightful examination of pre-revolutionary economic conditions in Spain that gave rise to the worker and peasant initiatives Leval documents and analyses in the bulk of his study.

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